Product and Process Design for Supply Chain Management (back to catalog)

OverviewSample 1Sample 2Sample 3Sample 4Sample 5Sample 6About the Author

Warren H. Hausman is Professor of Operations Management in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. He is an Affiliated Faculty member with Stanford's Global Supply Chain Forum and with the Department's Operations Research Program; he also holds a Courtesy Faculty Appointment in Stanford's Graduate School of Business.

Professor Hausman has recently studied how RFID technology can revolutionize the management of supply chains. He has investigated the value of RFID applications in retail environments, in logistics, and in manufacturing and assembly operations. He has also studied how operational improvements in retail supply chains affect a company's financial performance and market capitalization. He recently completed projects with Visa International and The World Bank dealing with Financial Flows & Supply Chain Efficiency and Global Logistics Indicators, respectively. He is now initiating research on the benefits of improved global trade management in reducing logistics frictions.

Professor Hausman has performed numerous research studies in supply chain management and operations management. He is the author or co-author of more than fifty technical articles on these subjects that have appeared in leading academic journals such as Management Science, Operations Research, Naval Research Logistics, and IIE Transactions. He is also a co-author of Quantitative Analysis for Management, a popular textbook now in its Ninth Edition (McGraw-Hill, 1997).

Professor Hausman served as the Departmental Editor for Logistics for Management Science from 1974 to 1982. In 1994 he was elected President of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA). He has also served on the Board of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) and on several National Science Foundation Advisory Panels and Committees. He is a Fellow of INFORMS, a Distinguished Fellow of the Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Society, and a Fellow of the Production & Operations Management Society. He has also won several teaching awards, including the Eugene Grant Teaching Award in Stanford's School of Engineering.

Professor Hausman is an active consultant to industry and is involved in numerous executive education programs both at Stanford and around the world. He was the founding director of a two-day executive program on Integrated Supply Chain Management held semi-annually in Palo Alto, California from 1994 to 2003. His consulting clients represent the following industries: general manufacturing, electronics, computers, consumer products, food & beverage, transportation, healthcare, and high technology. He is also a co-founder of Supply Chain Online, which provides web-based corporate supply chain management training. He serves on the technical advisory boards of several Silicon Valley startups.

Professor Hausman served as Department Chair for the Industrial Engineering - Engineering Management Department at Stanford from 1982 to 1992. He earned a BA in Economics from Yale and a Ph.D. from M.I.T.'s Sloan School of Management.

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SCM106 Specifications

Title: Product and Process Design for Supply Chain Management

Rating:
4.3 / 5  (1145 ratings)

Total Reading Time: Approx. 1 - 2 hours (for average readers)

Word Count: Approx. 10,600 words

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Certificate: Counts toward Fundamentals of Supply Chain Management

Datasheet:  Download

Contents

  1. Introduction; Component Commonality, Modularity, Modular vs. Integral Design
  2. Universality
  3. Framework for Costs and Benefits
  4. Benefits of Design Changes
  5. Benefits of Design Changes, Continued
  6. Postponement: The HP Deskjet Printer
  7. Postponement Costs and Benefits (Deskjet Printer, continued)
  8. A Quick Estimate of Postponement Benefits from Reduced Inventories
  9. Packaging Postponement
  10. Postponement via Software
  11. End-of-Life and New Product Situations
  12. Process Design for Postponement
  13. Mass Customization
  14. Incentive Issues
  15. Conclusions
  16. Test Your Knowledge
  17. Feedback
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